Sex, Death, and Yoga – Part 1

deathandthemaiden1518_USESubmitted for your consideration: the most deeply entrenched and ubiquitous of all human convictions is the belief that we can attain happiness through the enjoyment of our senses. And why not? If human beings are just fortuitous fusions of stardust whose inexplicable sentience is a fleeting epiphenomenon sandwiched between two infinitudes of non-existence then we might as well devote ourselves to the accrual of as much sensual enjoyment as possible.

Right?

Modernity has endowed this proposition with the status of an a priori assumption: our ‘To-do’ lists are testimony to our unexamined preoccupation with fulfilling it. But there are inconvenient facts hiding in plain sight that, once recognized and acknowledged, irrevocably undermine this assumption. [Read more...]

Veganism, Cows, and Dharma

ElizabethAndCow_350x250In yoga, veganism is not an end unto itself: it’s a means to an end, an incremental step towards re-establishing the natural relationship between human beings and all other living beings, especially the natural, symbiotic relationship between humans and cows.

The idea that humans and cows have a naturally symbiotic relationship may strike some readers as anything but obvious. That’s understandable given the frame of reference most people associate with farm animals. Yoga asks us to radically re-frame the relationship, to think of cows not as consumable objects of our experience but as sentient subjects of their own experience. Cows have lives of their own and, like all living entities, find the fulfillment of their own lives through relationships with others.

[Read more...]

Bhakti, Others, Words, and Meaning

radha_feet_krishna_sOnce upon a time, words meant something. They came fully equipped with definitions. If you didn’t know what a word meant, you could look it up. We deferred to an authority on the word in question, learned the proper and appropriate usage of the word, and articulated coherent and consistent messages with them.

But that was then and this is now. Today words are meaningless because they can mean whatever you want them to mean. Words come to us open to interpretation, requiring extensive contextualization to know which variation of personalized meaning we’re working with. There’s no authority to defer to because we’re all our own ultimate authority on anything and everything; our personal truths are the only reality so our own definitions are the only ones that are real… for us. Identical sentences using the same words in the same order are no longer guaranteed to carry a consistent message. [Read more...]

Yogic Values, Diversity, and Inclusivity

LuluLogoDiversity

I had the good fortune to score one of only a hundred seats for The Practice of Leadership, a panel discussion held at the Yoga Journal Conference in New York City this past weekend. The discussion grew out of Seane Corn’s decision to decline an invitation from Lululemon to participate in a leadership training program they were developing for the Yoga Journal Conferences. Ms. Corn explained the reason for her decision:

I told them that I couldn’t be a part of a training program they were hosting unless they themselves were willing to model true leadership, which includes ownership. Their lack of transparency and silence around the controversy in 2013 was irresponsible.”

The “controversy” was a perfect storm of long-standing questions regarding the compatibility of Lululemon’s philosophy and ethics with those of yoga combined with incendiary statements by Lululemon founder and majority shareholder Chip Wilson regarding, among other things, problems with Lululemon’s product line. It all resulted in a public relations disaster and an invitation from Alanna Kaivalya in a phenomenally viral Huffington Post article.

The Practice of Leadership panel discussion was described as follows: [Read more...]

Ten Years After

NYC-Ten-Years-After

Photos © James and Karla Murray

In a few weeks I’ll be visiting some of my old neighborhoods in New York City. It’s been a while since my last visit and I expect to feel discombobulated by its unfamiliarity. Like a time-displaced Captain America bounding into a future-ized Times Square, I’ll recognize all the old familiar places that this heart of mine embraces and reconcile myself to the fact that they look all wrong.

But it’s not just a case of sullen nostalgia because my old haunts don’t look they way they used to; it’s a case of disenchantment because now my old haunts look just like everyplace else. When I was born, no other city in America looked like New York City. Now, New York City looks a lot like everyplace else. People from Des Moines can have dinner in New York at the same restaurant they go to in… Des Moines! C’mon: really? You’re in the Big Apple and you want to eat at Applebee’s?

Every day everyplace looks a little more like everyplace else: the same corporate brands, the same architectural design, the same urban planning, the same kind of commoditized experience, sanitized and made safe for mass consumption. You used to be able to escape from the malaise of the suburbs by moving into The City. Now, the only real difference is that you won’t need a car (but you will need a trust fund). [Read more...]